Where to find us:

classic radio shop 

212 Roughton Road

Cromer. Norfolk NR27 9LQ

close to Roughton Road station


Phone: +44 01263 519278

Mobile 07743372028

 

Note. call the main line first as the mobile is on only occasionally.

 

contact Mark at

 

classicradioshop@gmail.com

 

 

                      

 

Business hours. We are open when ever you need us. Monday - Sunday

What's new?

We constantly up-grading our stock of period radio's

 

Retro with Classic designs are now very popular. There are a number of client's who collect from a certain decade, this can be for personal interest or as props in television or film, through to interior design. At times we are asked to supply good looking models but are not fully functional. If there is a particular period radio you require please contact me to your specific needs so we can do the hard work for you.

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Kolster-Brandes FB10 (Toaster) 1952

These radio's due to there small size was marketed as "The Magic Midget" and at only 23cm width, 15cm depth and 18cm in height this is indeed a remarkable little receiver. Offering 2 bands, medium , Long wave  an unusual midget feature is the use of a mains auto-transformer, which avoids the generation of considerable amount of heat common in the Bush DAC series. The radio has been taken apart all standard components replaced, the rather unusall 422Kcs I.F peaked and of course the RF and oscillator stages re-set to the original specification. As these were first introduced in September 1950 costing £8 17s 1d nearly half the price of its rival, the Bush DAC90A, it was a great value radio, for use either in the bedroom or in the kitchen. As history as shown British made goods "those were the days" were more in demand rather than the American midgets such as this, there was a fear that parts may have been difficult to source if they were failures, though in fact this was more a competative sales point than anything else.

Another good feature is the dial light moves along with the cursor, something that Bush could have learnt a lesson from.

The radio is in first class condition, with no cracks or damage and works very well with the new improved early ferrite inbuilt aerial, but does allow you to fit an external one if you wish to do so. It is a set that fits perfectly into a modern home and is popular with collectors as good examples are not easy to locate. Comes complete with 1 years warranty

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Kolster-Brandes FB10 (Toaster) 1952

£155.00 incl. P&P

These radio's due to there small size was marketed as "The Magic Midget" and at only 23cm width, 15cm depth and 18cm in height this is indeed a remarkable little receiver. Offering 2 bands, medium , Long wave  an unusual midget feature is the use of a mains auto-transformer, which avoids the generation of considerable amount of heat common in the Bush DAC series. The radio has been taken apart all standard components replaced, the rather unusall 422Kcs I.F peaked and of course the RF and oscillator stages re-set to the original specification. As these were first introduced in September 1950 costing £8 17s 1d nearly half the price of its rival, the Bush DAC90A, it was a great value radio, for use either in the bedroom or in the kitchen. As history as shown British made goods "those were the days" were more in demand rather than the American midgets such as this, there was a fear that parts may have been difficult to source if they were failures, though in fact this was more a competative sales point than anything else.

Another good feature is the dial light moves along with the cursor, something that Bush could have learnt a lesson from.

The radio is in first class condition, with no cracks or damage and works very well with the new improved early ferrite inbuilt aerial, but does allow you to fit an external one if you wish to do so. It is a set that fits perfectly into a modern home and is popular with collectors as good examples are not easy to locate. Comes complete with 1 years warranty


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Rear view of the chassis of the KB FB10

Those of you who are familar with these radio's will have noticed this is a later model with additional upgrades, all the valves apart from the left hand side (half wave rectifier) are now fitted with B9A valve bases, using 6BE6, 6BA6 ,EBC90 and of interest the 6BW6 audio amplifier first introduced in 1950. The original audio output valve 6V6GT was first introduced in 1937, so as the first models came off the production line it seems possible that these were going to become difficult to keep production going. So perhaps within a year or so a new design was being developed and again costs in production could be reduced by the aerial . How many of these were produced i'm not sure as all the others I have seen or information on these sets only identify the first production model.

Under chassis view, with component changes seen

Bush B801 portable radio (1963) SOLD

A very nice condition Bush portable radio first introduced in June 1963, the leather carrying case is perfect, not a mark on it. This radio was marketed both by Bush and Murphy as by then the companies were owned by the Rank organisation, the only difference was Murphy's version was a red plastic body with black leather case , and this Bush version blue plastic body with tan leather case.

The radio originaly cost £11 4s 9d and offers MW 194 - 545 metres and LW 1,130 - 1,900 Metres.The audio output is in the order of 200mw which for a personal receiver is perfect. The I.F at 470Kcs has been re-aligned and interestingly the RF has been set up, I mention this as unlike most receivers, there's usually  some datum line or frequency marker to allow the calibration ,on these there are none, only station names, so setting up for example 600Kcs (500 metres) on the scale for the local oscillator is a bit of fun.

The radio comes complete with battery (9.0 Volt) and for not a lot of money a nice example of an early 60's transistor radio with fully gurantee.

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Bush B801 portable radio (1963) SOLD

£75.00 SOLD

A very nice condition Bush portable radio first introduced in June 1963, the leather carrying case is perfect, not a mark on it. This radio was marketed both by Bush and Murphy as by then the companies were owned by the Rank organisation, the only difference was Murphy's version was a red plastic body with black leather case , and this Bush version blue plastic body with tan leather case.

The radio originaly cost £11 4s 9d and offers MW 194 - 545 metres and LW 1,130 - 1,900 Metres.The audio output is in the order of 200mw which for a personal receiver is perfect. The I.F at 470Kcs has been re-aligned and interestingly the RF has been set up, I mention this as unlike most receivers, there's usually  some datum line or frequency marker to allow the calibration ,on these there are none, only station names, so setting up for example 600Kcs (500 metres) on the scale for the local oscillator is a bit of fun.

The radio comes complete with battery (9.0 Volt) and for not a lot of money a nice example of an early 60's transistor radio with fully gurantee.


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Close up of the Bush B801 chassis, this was before the ferrite rod aerial was re-postioned and the local oscillator transistor replaced to improve gain. A nice compact radio measuring

16cm width, 10cm in height and 6cm in width in its case

£145.00
incl P&P
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Bush DAC90A (1953)

 

The most popular classic radio availible is the Iconic Bush DAC90A. A five valve radio, AC/DC transportable superhetrodyne receiver which has Medium Wave and Long wave switchable from the side. These receivers are small in size 9.25 inches height, 7.5 inches depth and 12.75 inches in width and therefore fit comfortably in any modern home.To ensure reliabilty as standard all the components that would require replacement have been done. The on/off switch , volume control have been taken apart and cleaned as well. The I.F section and RF sections have been aligned and therefore is very sensistive and responsive.

 

Due to its simple chassis and good design this is a radio you can use and enjoy every day, another added bonus is now the avaliabilty of the original 3.5 Volt dial lamps to improve the tuning dial. This one as can be seen in the photo is finished in a Walnut stylel (Bakelite) though a plastic variation of Bakelite (Catalin) can be found in the Ivory version though, these are in fact trade names of the product, but Catalin is more brittle and models are often shown with either cracks or chips to the body.

As with all these models the power supply is a simple half wave rectifier but works very well. These use a UL41 as an audio output valve, if at times you hear a slight mains hum, often the fault will be due to a cathode to heater leak, I have found this on many of these valves hence a new replacement.

This model is in very good  condition with only slight marking to the polished cabinet, the contol knobs and wave switch selector is perfect. I haver never quite understood why you see damage to these as often as you do it would be the last thing to get misuse and comes complete with the original 2 pin plug, including the 12 months guarantee, would make either a great present or why not just treat yourself.

 

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Bush DAC90A (1953)

£145.00 incl P&P

 

The most popular classic radio availible is the Iconic Bush DAC90A. A five valve radio, AC/DC transportable superhetrodyne receiver which has Medium Wave and Long wave switchable from the side. These receivers are small in size 9.25 inches height, 7.5 inches depth and 12.75 inches in width and therefore fit comfortably in any modern home.To ensure reliabilty as standard all the components that would require replacement have been done. The on/off switch , volume control have been taken apart and cleaned as well. The I.F section and RF sections have been aligned and therefore is very sensistive and responsive.

 

Due to its simple chassis and good design this is a radio you can use and enjoy every day, another added bonus is now the avaliabilty of the original 3.5 Volt dial lamps to improve the tuning dial. This one as can be seen in the photo is finished in a Walnut stylel (Bakelite) though a plastic variation of Bakelite (Catalin) can be found in the Ivory version though, these are in fact trade names of the product, but Catalin is more brittle and models are often shown with either cracks or chips to the body.

As with all these models the power supply is a simple half wave rectifier but works very well. These use a UL41 as an audio output valve, if at times you hear a slight mains hum, often the fault will be due to a cathode to heater leak, I have found this on many of these valves hence a new replacement.

This model is in very good  condition with only slight marking to the polished cabinet, the contol knobs and wave switch selector is perfect. I haver never quite understood why you see damage to these as often as you do it would be the last thing to get misuse and comes complete with the original 2 pin plug, including the 12 months guarantee, would make either a great present or why not just treat yourself.

 


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£110.00
incl. P&P
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PAM TB59 (1958)

The Pamphonic reproducers Ltd radio TB59 has an interesting history, most collectors of these early transistor radio's would have heard of the first British transistor radio Pam 710 of course designed and built in fact by Pye. But being concerned with their puplic image and therefore placed these under a different name, just in case the people did not buy into the new technology. Of course they did and just over a year Pye using the same basic circuit produced the Pye model P123BQ, a number of examples including the first will be seen on here very soon. The first Pam as already mentioned was in production for not very long, so a new version was introduced perhaps it was due to the fact that the Pam radio though exspensive some £24 in 1956 then Pam720 so for a better word Pye were the market leaders, and a new model was released the Pam TB59 in 1959. The model is in design the same as the Pye Q4 using 6 off yellow circle transistors with an approx audio output of 200MW.

The radio is as it was first produced, no component needed replacing and works very well indeed, as any peice of furniture of the time, there is some wear to the case, but minimal , the usual issues with the top button bright knobs are often rusted or pitted and very slight wear to the handle, But overall a nice example and in many ways more attractive than other models at this time, it cannot be a coincident that the handbag styling was to attract the lady buyers of the late 1950,s .Another early example of a transistor radio from the late 1950's costing £19.00 quite an investment for the lady of the house.

Runs off 6 volt battery PP1 supplied and come with 6 months warranty.

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PAM TB59 (1958)

£110.00 incl. P&P

The Pamphonic reproducers Ltd radio TB59 has an interesting history, most collectors of these early transistor radio's would have heard of the first British transistor radio Pam 710 of course designed and built in fact by Pye. But being concerned with their puplic image and therefore placed these under a different name, just in case the people did not buy into the new technology. Of course they did and just over a year Pye using the same basic circuit produced the Pye model P123BQ, a number of examples including the first will be seen on here very soon. The first Pam as already mentioned was in production for not very long, so a new version was introduced perhaps it was due to the fact that the Pam radio though exspensive some £24 in 1956 then Pam720 so for a better word Pye were the market leaders, and a new model was released the Pam TB59 in 1959. The model is in design the same as the Pye Q4 using 6 off yellow circle transistors with an approx audio output of 200MW.

The radio is as it was first produced, no component needed replacing and works very well indeed, as any peice of furniture of the time, there is some wear to the case, but minimal , the usual issues with the top button bright knobs are often rusted or pitted and very slight wear to the handle, But overall a nice example and in many ways more attractive than other models at this time, it cannot be a coincident that the handbag styling was to attract the lady buyers of the late 1950,s .Another early example of a transistor radio from the late 1950's costing £19.00 quite an investment for the lady of the house.

Runs off 6 volt battery PP1 supplied and come with 6 months warranty.


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View of the Pam TB59 taken apart to show component layout and original fittings

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