Where to find us:

classic radio shop 

212 Roughton Road

Cromer. Norfolk NR27 9LQ

close to Roughton Road station


Phone: +44 01263 519278

Mobile 07743372028

 

Note. call the main line first as the mobile is on only occasionally.

 

contact Mark at

 

classicradioshop@gmail.com

 

 

                      

 

Business hours. We are open when ever you need us. Monday - Sunday

What's new?

We constantly up-grading our stock of period radio's

 

Retro with Classic designs are now very popular. There are a number of client's who collect from a certain decade, this can be for personal interest or as props in television or film, through to interior design. At times we are asked to supply good looking models but are not fully functional. If there is a particular period radio you require please contact me to your specific needs so we can do the hard work for you.

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£75.00
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Ekco PT 352 portable radio (12th July 1962)

This early transistor portable radio, has all its original guarantee card and repair/service receipts from 1964 & 1966.

The radio was first produced by E.K.Cole Ltd in 1960 and costing £10 6s 8d plus tax, so was quite exspensive, but allowing the owner to have a small portable radio of only 8 inches width. The circuit uses the OC range of transistors and now with the standard 470 Khz I.F frequency. It offeres tunuable Medium wave and fixed Long wave reception. The radio is in overall good condition with only wear to the EKCO label on the front case. The radio has had all the de-coubling components repaced including all the electorolitic capacitors as well. Often when a radio in this case 55 years old age related issues start to show. The radio works very well and very selective to the positioning of the Ferrite aerial. The radio originaly would have had a PP4 9.0Volt battery this has been replaced to fit the standard PP3 today.

The radio comes complete with its original presentation box, see photo's as well as original documentation and service history and 1 years gurantee.

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Ekco PT 352 portable radio (12th July 1962)

£75.00 incl. P&P

This early transistor portable radio, has all its original guarantee card and repair/service receipts from 1964 & 1966.

The radio was first produced by E.K.Cole Ltd in 1960 and costing £10 6s 8d plus tax, so was quite exspensive, but allowing the owner to have a small portable radio of only 8 inches width. The circuit uses the OC range of transistors and now with the standard 470 Khz I.F frequency. It offeres tunuable Medium wave and fixed Long wave reception. The radio is in overall good condition with only wear to the EKCO label on the front case. The radio has had all the de-coubling components repaced including all the electorolitic capacitors as well. Often when a radio in this case 55 years old age related issues start to show. The radio works very well and very selective to the positioning of the Ferrite aerial. The radio originaly would have had a PP4 9.0Volt battery this has been replaced to fit the standard PP3 today.

The radio comes complete with its original presentation box, see photo's as well as original documentation and service history and 1 years gurantee.


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Ekco PT352 , serial no 100026, showing components, as stated all de-coupling components and electrolitic capacitors have all been replaced. A interesting and early radio of the 1960 period.

£165.00
incl.P&P
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Bush VTR103C serial no 000048

The VTR103 was first introduced in 1961, the radio offered VHF as well as the standard Medium and Long wave  stations.

The coverage was from 88 to 100 Mhz and was the first VHF British portable radio. For the first time the AF series of transistors were introduced as these offered improved HF performance over the O.C range, though of course we all know the issues with these Alloy-Diffusion transistors. I find some radio's have real issues while other do not with these and I can only come to the conclusion that production issues were involved. This radio being the C version means it was first introduced in 1964, due to the very low serial number I would say the first week of production, the difference is only in the colour scheme of light Blue/green case and Blue rexin and chrome trim, matching at the time the TR82C model.

The radio works very well and the original telescopic aerial is present with the red tip.The radio has the earphone socket to the side and the tuning dial is very clear, with a perfect body. As always with few exceptions the band select switches have faded due to use, for some reason unlike the 2 band TR series the 3 band VTR switches were not embossed so unless the radio was often used on one band the lettering would wear.

Comes complete with 1 years gurantee and the PP9 battery required.

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Bush VTR103C serial no 000048

£165.00 incl.P&P

The VTR103 was first introduced in 1961, the radio offered VHF as well as the standard Medium and Long wave  stations.

The coverage was from 88 to 100 Mhz and was the first VHF British portable radio. For the first time the AF series of transistors were introduced as these offered improved HF performance over the O.C range, though of course we all know the issues with these Alloy-Diffusion transistors. I find some radio's have real issues while other do not with these and I can only come to the conclusion that production issues were involved. This radio being the C version means it was first introduced in 1964, due to the very low serial number I would say the first week of production, the difference is only in the colour scheme of light Blue/green case and Blue rexin and chrome trim, matching at the time the TR82C model.

The radio works very well and the original telescopic aerial is present with the red tip.The radio has the earphone socket to the side and the tuning dial is very clear, with a perfect body. As always with few exceptions the band select switches have faded due to use, for some reason unlike the 2 band TR series the 3 band VTR switches were not embossed so unless the radio was often used on one band the lettering would wear.

Comes complete with 1 years gurantee and the PP9 battery required.


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VTR103C rear view with cover removed showing clean chassis, some of the de-coupling components have been replaced, all the transistors are original . The phot's were taken with a flash and therefore do not show the real light/blue case colour.

To find another low serial number model would be very hard to find, if one now exsits.

£150.00
Incl P&P
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Bush DAC90 (1948)

Very nice clean example of the popular Bush DAC range this being the early version in Walnut finish, as it is not in black this must be a later production run as this fits in with the later A version and I would place this around 1948.

The popular DAC 90 series started off with the 90 and was produced from 1946, though i cannot find a month when production started. As the A version was produced in 1950 these were soon upgraded and the reasons why are offered here. First of all the larger mains dropper was installed to the rear and perhaps this was to reduce in the Bakerlite case the heat given off by this, and therfore reducing stress. The valves installed at this time had lower heater operating voltages so clearly the mains dropper resistor to reduce the voltage down would have to be quite large in size, within a short period higher heater voltage valves were produced and helped to aid in the reduction of the size of this resistor and was installed in the new A series away from the rear cover. The tuning control is fitted on the right hand side and is fitted to the tuning capacitor via its long shaft through the MW and LW aerial so pending stray capacitance from your hand it is possible to notice a slight alignment movement of the signal as your hand moves away from this, though slight,perhaps on weak stations this might be more noticable. These first models have the speaker connected to its chassis, and later to aid in production costs the A series had this fitted seperatly, again the speaker grill here cloth in this model was replaced with a punched out metal grill, (more cost effective). And just a matter of interest , the pilot lamp used for the display was fitted in the centre only, while the A series models had two one either side.

That aside of the historic development, how does this radio compare today. It was a hit then and these little radio's are still sought after today, it works very well indeed and as standard all de-coupling components replaced, valves tested and I.F and RF alignment work undertaken. Comes with its original 2 pin mains plug and 1 years gurantee

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Bush DAC90 (1948)

£150.00 Incl P&P

Very nice clean example of the popular Bush DAC range this being the early version in Walnut finish, as it is not in black this must be a later production run as this fits in with the later A version and I would place this around 1948.

The popular DAC 90 series started off with the 90 and was produced from 1946, though i cannot find a month when production started. As the A version was produced in 1950 these were soon upgraded and the reasons why are offered here. First of all the larger mains dropper was installed to the rear and perhaps this was to reduce in the Bakerlite case the heat given off by this, and therfore reducing stress. The valves installed at this time had lower heater operating voltages so clearly the mains dropper resistor to reduce the voltage down would have to be quite large in size, within a short period higher heater voltage valves were produced and helped to aid in the reduction of the size of this resistor and was installed in the new A series away from the rear cover. The tuning control is fitted on the right hand side and is fitted to the tuning capacitor via its long shaft through the MW and LW aerial so pending stray capacitance from your hand it is possible to notice a slight alignment movement of the signal as your hand moves away from this, though slight,perhaps on weak stations this might be more noticable. These first models have the speaker connected to its chassis, and later to aid in production costs the A series had this fitted seperatly, again the speaker grill here cloth in this model was replaced with a punched out metal grill, (more cost effective). And just a matter of interest , the pilot lamp used for the display was fitted in the centre only, while the A series models had two one either side.

That aside of the historic development, how does this radio compare today. It was a hit then and these little radio's are still sought after today, it works very well indeed and as standard all de-coupling components replaced, valves tested and I.F and RF alignment work undertaken. Comes with its original 2 pin mains plug and 1 years gurantee


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Rear panel view of the Bush DAC90

This rear panel as with all of these earlier models has repairs to the cover to ensure fingers cannot touch the mains dropper. More importantly this radio was sold via Harrods around 1948 and at that time the retail cost was in the order of £12 11s 4d but by June this again had dropped by a couple of shillings . Harrods I would have thought must have charged the standard Bush retail price , so was purchased by somebody locally , oh if it could only talk

PYE P191 BQ (1961) SOLD

This is for the serious early transistor radio collector the Pye P191BQ, there is even one at the Science Musuem in London. The radio needed minimum work undertaken to ensure it works to the original specification with just 3 coupling components replaced.

The chassis is different to the first model and now uses a 9 volt supply, the transistors of this slightly later  period are identified as white spot

The radio is tuneable on medium wave and  LW . The local oscillator coil L4 tuning slug has been glued in place, so I'm reluctant to attempt to re-tuning it as damage would mean no replacement possible, though it does seem fine. On the broadcast bands the radio work very well and the Ferrite rod aerial is very sensitive in direction.Though the audio output is fine though would not be equal to a later radio and perhaps thats why this later model had the earphone socket to allow this The I.F circuit has been re-aligned again did not require much adjustment.

Overall condition is good with very slight wear to the sides and a little more to one rear button holding the battery cover on. Comes complete with PP3 battery and full gurantee

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PYE P191 BQ (1961) SOLD

£75.00 SOLD

This is for the serious early transistor radio collector the Pye P191BQ, there is even one at the Science Musuem in London. The radio needed minimum work undertaken to ensure it works to the original specification with just 3 coupling components replaced.

The chassis is different to the first model and now uses a 9 volt supply, the transistors of this slightly later  period are identified as white spot

The radio is tuneable on medium wave and  LW . The local oscillator coil L4 tuning slug has been glued in place, so I'm reluctant to attempt to re-tuning it as damage would mean no replacement possible, though it does seem fine. On the broadcast bands the radio work very well and the Ferrite rod aerial is very sensitive in direction.Though the audio output is fine though would not be equal to a later radio and perhaps thats why this later model had the earphone socket to allow this The I.F circuit has been re-aligned again did not require much adjustment.

Overall condition is good with very slight wear to the sides and a little more to one rear button holding the battery cover on. Comes complete with PP3 battery and full gurantee


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Chassis exposed with the top speaker cover removed , the variable tuning capacitor is fitted via the top plate, within a space of a year the ferrite rod had been upgraded to circular version, the 150 mw or so of audio output is taken from the push/pull audio transistors visible on the lower left hand side of the picture, again far left is the output transformer, the green components are the 0.1 uf capacitors that were replaced.

£70.00
incl. P&P
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PYE P191BQ (1962) RED

Another early portable transistor radio, the specification is identical to the previous model shown above. The radio has had all the work required to ensure it works well on both Medium and Long wave. The transistors are all original and this runs off from a 9.0Volt PP3 supplied.

General condition is good, with slight ware to one of the rear press studs, the only difference is the leather case is in red.

offered with 1 years gurantee

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PYE P191BQ (1962) RED

£70.00 incl. P&P

Another early portable transistor radio, the specification is identical to the previous model shown above. The radio has had all the work required to ensure it works well on both Medium and Long wave. The transistors are all original and this runs off from a 9.0Volt PP3 supplied.

General condition is good, with slight ware to one of the rear press studs, the only difference is the leather case is in red.

offered with 1 years gurantee


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£115.00
incl. P&P
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PYE P191BQ 1959/1960 Rare model

This is for the serious early transistor radio collector the Pye P191BQ, there is even one at the Science Musuem in London. The radio has had a lot of work undertaken to ensure it works to the original specification with some general coupling components and one audio output transistor where the base lead came off after works were completed replaced.

The chassis is the same as the P160BQ and the radio uses a 6 volt supply, the transistors of this period are identified as to there purpose by just a single number 1 to 6 and the output transistors were supplied by Newmarket Transistor co.

The radio is tuneable on medium wave and preset to LW channel 1500m, which means its slightly off frequency to Radio 4 these days. The local oscillator coil L4 tuning slug has been glued in place, so I'm reluctant to attempt to re-tuning it as damage would mean no replacement possible, though the Pye P123BQ is a similar chassis the oscillator coil though similar is not suitable. On Medium wave the radio work very well and the Ferrite rod aerial is very sensitive in direction. The I.F circuit has been set and interesting that the sensitivity limits to around 80 - 100 micro-volt input, unlike slightly later radio's of the 1960 - 61 period which you can acheive 10 - 20 micro volt sensitivity. The radio general condition is good and good volume is possible from the 50 mm loud speaker.

The radio is part of early transistor design and would have been very exspensive to have purchased, the 6 volt supply is via 4 1.5 volt  AA cells supplied.

The radio comes complete with 6 months warranty

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PYE P191BQ 1959/1960 Rare model

£115.00 incl. P&P

This is for the serious early transistor radio collector the Pye P191BQ, there is even one at the Science Musuem in London. The radio has had a lot of work undertaken to ensure it works to the original specification with some general coupling components and one audio output transistor where the base lead came off after works were completed replaced.

The chassis is the same as the P160BQ and the radio uses a 6 volt supply, the transistors of this period are identified as to there purpose by just a single number 1 to 6 and the output transistors were supplied by Newmarket Transistor co.

The radio is tuneable on medium wave and preset to LW channel 1500m, which means its slightly off frequency to Radio 4 these days. The local oscillator coil L4 tuning slug has been glued in place, so I'm reluctant to attempt to re-tuning it as damage would mean no replacement possible, though the Pye P123BQ is a similar chassis the oscillator coil though similar is not suitable. On Medium wave the radio work very well and the Ferrite rod aerial is very sensitive in direction. The I.F circuit has been set and interesting that the sensitivity limits to around 80 - 100 micro-volt input, unlike slightly later radio's of the 1960 - 61 period which you can acheive 10 - 20 micro volt sensitivity. The radio general condition is good and good volume is possible from the 50 mm loud speaker.

The radio is part of early transistor design and would have been very exspensive to have purchased, the 6 volt supply is via 4 1.5 volt  AA cells supplied.

The radio comes complete with 6 months warranty


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The Pye P191BQ chassis , interesting when fault finding this radio part of the return circuit, in this period postive uses the aluminium case to connect the circuits together, if not known the first I.F stage is in fact not operating, As can be seen in the picture the phase splitter audio transformer is on the far left hand side , while the centre tapped audio output transformer is in the middle. The space between to allow the speaker to fit. The local oscillator coil L4 is just to the left of the audio output transformer.

The Pye P191BQ with the cover plate now installed, again the tuning capacitor only is connected when fitted to this plate. There are holes in the plate to allow final tuning of the I.F coils and Local oscillator coil.

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